• Glass,  Upcycling

    Polish vodka bottle cut

    This vodka is the best and the most famous Polish vodka. It’s yummy, which is quite unusual! Bittersweet, herbal taste. I remembered to remove the cap during the “glass cracking” part. I must say the first (buying + drinking) and the second part (cutting + cracking) of the project went very smoothly. The cut glass looks nice and it’s symmetrical and round rather than oval and uneven. When I moved to the third part, which was polishing I made a couple of mistakes that had to be reworked. First things first. Sanding with coarse sandpaper was followed by a final…

  • Featured,  Wood

    Gallows lamp

    3 pieces of wood and 4 dowels were used in this project. The length of the arm was approximately half of the dining table, so the light could spread evenly throughout the top. I started by cutting the tenon on my table saw and then shaping the other end of that arm. To minimize any tear-out I drilled the hole before proceeding to my sanding station. I wasn’t sure what bulb holder would be installed (plastic or metal) so I used for this project a 3-core cable, just in case. Sanding took a while. I used more aggressive belts first…

  • Wood

    Cocktail tabouret

    Made of 6 pieces of wood, dowels not included. Angles are 45° and 60°. Quite simple construction but the 60° angles had to be cut very precisely. I started by cutting all the pieces to length, and then I cut little grooves into the top pieces. Initially, I was going to use dowels and glue, but these angles made me change my mind – I had to use additional fasteners – screws. So I had to drill some countersunk holes for the legs and using screws and glue I fixed the legs to the top. I used longer screws and…

  • Tools,  Wood

    Mini table saw sledge

    A must-have jig for every woodworker. Due to the limited storage space, I decided to build a mini version, with only one, but adjustable runner. I used plywood from my router tabletop as it wasn’t used very often. First I removed all the plastic caps and then the screws. Using my straight line jig I cut the runner to width. Sanding and drilling holes came next. The runner can be adjusted with 4 little screws that also prevent the sledge from popping out of the slot. Fixing the back fence at the perfect angle took me 3 attempts thus there…

  • Glass,  Upcycling

    Cut Kahlua bottle

    Buying, drinking, cutting and polishing – several steps to get a perfect flower pot. Very unique and rare. A perfect gift for someone you care about. The first thing to do was to score a line with my homemade jig. Then the usual – cold and boiling water to crack the glass. Sanding the outside edges came next. First the top and when I used the 220 grit I sanded the bevel for the first time. Up to the 3000 grit. As always the next step was to install my drum sander. I used 240, 400 and 600-grit sanding bands.…

  • Wood

    Faux granite shelving unit

    Made of aluminium, MDF and spruce. No fancy joinery, just rivets and screws. The project combines a modern approach and some Far East techniques. First I cut the MDF to size, did some light sanding (the edges) and then I prepared the aluminium legs. I wanted some chaotic pattern on the outside walls so I came up with the idea – to wrap the roller sleeve with some painter’s tape and apply old-fashioned, oil-based paint – white and graphite. I didn’t know what to expect but eventually, I liked what I got. I covered it with a couple of layers…

  • Wood

    Charred half log stand

    It’s made from a single piece of hardwood, sycamore (maple) tree that I cut down last year in my backyard. It’s charred with shou sugi ban, it’s waxed and it has 3 legs. I had to make sure that the wood will char nicely before I started the project. It did so I set up my router flattening jig. Due to the height of the material I used my workbench legs as the rails. The top and the bottom are parallel to each other. Also, the legs are at 90º to the base. I removed some material with a router…

  • Glass,  Upcycling,  Wood

    Cylindrical tealight holders

    A quite simple project that involved turning an old balustrade post, cracked and riddled and cutting wine bottles. I used my recently built router turning jig to turn one cylinder, slightly bigger in diameter as that was reduced later on by sanding. I noticed that there is actually no need to rotate the piece all the time, and what worked was to route it all the way through, from one end to another and then rotate it clockwise a little bit, do the pass and so on. That didn’t apply to the recesses at both ends. Once it was done…

  • Wood

    Quick bowl

    To cut out the disc I used 1 flush trim router bit, 2 base plates and reversed parallel fence. The first cut was done halfway through to prepare the groove for the bearing, which was obviously the same size as the bit. Once I had the disc done I reversed the parallel fence to its original setup, I swapped the base plates and installed my bowl router bit. I took a couple of passes for the outside groove and then I used my plunge base to remove the centrepiece. I flipped the bowl over and used a round-over bit for…

  • Wood

    Burnt tote box

    A piece of scrap wood was cut to size on my table saw. I then prepared the router table and the system of fences. It actually worked very well, but it was only set for a shallow, first pass, to route the recess for future processing. I then clamped the piece down and used another flush trim bit to deepen the groove. It looked quite nice at that stage, but I decided to round off all the edges with my round-over bit. It looked rudely before sanding, quite bad and I had second thoughts… But after sanding it got a…